Kalama Stand Up Paddleboard Kamp is a hit

22nd March 2017 5:45 pm

Dave Kalama’s STAND UP PADDLEBOARD Kamp was an instant hit here in the TCI. Together with Philip from Big Blue, Brody Welte (Dave’s partner) and John Denney, 8 participants from first timers to experienced paddlers tasted the best the TCI had to offer. Perfect waves, learner waves, downwinders, mangrove excursions and even a moonlight paddle as well as excellent snorkeling. Each morning was started with Dave’s scaled down version of his big wave preseason beach work out, followed by instruction in paddle techniques. 18 different Naish SUP boards were used in the Big Blue fleet with everyone enjoying a variety of different conditions and performance.
This camp was so successful we are already planning the next one! Dates will be confirmed before the new year, cross fingers.
The expertise of Dave, Brody and John proved invaluable while Philip’s local knowledge and passion helped make this Kamp fun, safe, flexible and adventurous.
“This is a great location,” Dave said, “this is perfect – there are so many factors to it that create a very adventurous experience for people.”
Brody added: “For us to be successful it’s essential that we partner with people like Philip and Big Blue – we would not exist without him.
“It’s essential to have someone that’s well established in the community and who let’s people come in and have their experience but leave no trace on the environment.”


Filed under: Activities, Sponsorship

Big Blue Part of Adopt a Mangove Program

1:39 pm

Adopt a Mangrove
Mother Nature and Human Nature working together – for a change.

Big Blue has set out to help the “Adopt a Mangrove” campaign in its efforts to support local conservation initiatives. It also provides an
opportunity for visitors to the Turks and Caicos to take part by donating time and money to this valuable program.

The Adopt a Mangrove Campaign is a conservation initiative to restore impacted areas and to reduce climate change by planting mangroves. It will act as a major campaign for Turks and Caicos Islands residents to unite in reducing the affects of climate change. Most importantly, community support of this endeavor will show our governing authorities and the world that the citizens of the TCI are serious about
preserving our Protected Areas, protecting our environment, and banding together to reduce climate change.

At present, there are 200 small mangroves now thriving on “Star Island” with another 200 seedlings in the nursery system being readied
for the transplant stage. For a donation of $25 you can adopt your very own mangrove and plant it on Big Blue’s Kayak Ecotour! On the guided kayak ecotour you will explore mangrove channels, learn about their ecological importance, and then stop at the planting grounds to plant your very own seedling!

Once “Adopt a Mangrove” has received your donation, you will be sent an e-certificate and your name will be added to the list of supporters. You will also have the option of receiving adopt a mangrove’s e-mail updates that will detail the annual growth and survival of our Star Island mangroves, as well as the new planting projects that they intend to undertake as the program and the mangroves grow.

For TCI residents, the adoption program can include plantings along the canal sustems and other backyard wetland areas where appropriate.
Private homeowners can protect and stabilize their waterside properties with mangroves and feel good about reducing their own
carbon footprint.

For more information please contact Big Blue at info@bigblueunlimited.com or visit www.merangel.net/mangroves


Filed under: Eco adventure, Sponsorship

TCI Wetland Program Continues

1:11 pm

The joint expedition to assess the wetland areas of the Turks and Caicos continued through the week with visits to North Caicos, Middle Caicos and Grand Turk. Mark Parrish of Big Blue caught up with the team to help lead a trip to the vital wetland areas between South Caicos and East Caicos. Initial findings and observations were then presented to an open meeting of stakeholders and interested parties at the National Environmental Centre. Aspects of the proposal that will be submitted to the Darwin Initiative later in the year were discussed including the designation of particular wetlands as new RAMSAR sites, the ‘wise use’ of these areas, and available international cooperation for RAMSAR sites. Ralph Higgs of the TCI Tourist Board invited Wesley Clerveaux, Director of the Department of Environmental and Coastal Resources (DECR) to a joint meeting with the TCI National Trust to assess cross department cooperation and use of resources. Dr. David Stroud suggested that the TCI might be the first country in the world to have a network of managed RAMSAR sites and explained how RAMSAR protection can be applied to mangroves, coral reefs, sea-grass beds and Karst or underground wetlands. This is set to be an ongoing project of significant importance to the environmental health of the Turks and Caicos Islands.


Filed under: Uncategorised

Catlin SeaView Survey

10:49 am

During the second week of November Big Blue’s expertise was called upon to help the Catlin Seaview Survey complete their tasks in the Turks and Caicos Islands. The mission of this 5-year global project in conjunction with the University of Queensland in Australia is ‘to record, research, and reveal the world’s coral reefs to all in high resolution, 360-degree panoramic vision.’ Big Blue provided staff, vessels and logistical support across the entire Caicos Islands for the survey team who visited the north shore reefs, West Caicos, French Cay and South Caicos.

 A team from Discovery Channel Canada’s Daily Planet series also flew down to film a short documentary about the Catlin project and they too turned to Big Blue to aid them with local advice and diving support. Look out for this production in the coming months.

The final piece of the jigsaw and not to be underestimated; the financial backers for the whole project is the Catlin Insurance company. The CEO Mr. Stephen Catlin brought down two groups of corporate guests for a little luxury treatment and using our new vessels, a 40ft Hinckley motor launch and a 44ft Manta Cat, along-side our ever versatile ‘Live & Direct’ adventure cat Big Blue delivered once again. We introduced 14 of the guests to the delights of Scuba over two days, facilitated a demonstration with the reef survey team, and conducted one of our signature ecological education eco-tours around the reefs, cays and mangrove ecosystems along the Caicos Cays. If we were able to impress the suits and help keep the Catlin sponsorship and interest alive then our mission was accomplished.

It was a fascinating week and we will closely follow the Catlin Seaview Survey on their continued global quest. The equipment that they are using is state of the art 3-Dimensional filming equipment with technology supplied by none other than media giants Google. The camera also uses a hybrid of facial recognition software to identify coral diseases and thereby aid in the documentation and standardization of coral reef surveys around the entire planet.



Big Blue Supports Enable Passion & the HTC Atlantic Kiteboarding Crossing

10:40 am

Big Blue Unlimited and our kiteboarding team have been asked to support and provide safety for a Turks and Caicos resident kiteboarding party to meet and greet the six riders crossing the Atlantic. The six riders will be met in the open ocean by a group of resident riders who will welcome them home on their last leg of their epic journey!

Expert Big Blue kite guides, Philip and Wes, will lead the six riders to their final destination – the beach in front of Blue Haven resort, right next to Big Blue’s base in Leeward.

The six riders will be riding non stop, 24hours a day, in 2-3 hour shifts. Their journey starts on Wednesday 20th and leaves from Fuerteventura, Canary Islands. If winds and currents co operate they should arrive in the Turks and Caicos Islands sometime between the 7-15th of December.

Big Blue will be ready and waiting and so will Turks and Caicos and the rest of the kiteboarding world.

Stand by!


Filed under: kite boarding

Big Blue & TCI Kiters Welcome Enable Passion

10:34 am

One month ago we were invited to help create a local on the water kiting event to welcome The Enable Passion kiters. The trans Atlantic kiteboarders had yet to leave Fuerteventura and their arrival was supposed to coincide with the Grand Opening of Enable Passion’s sponsors, Blue Haven Resort and Marina, on the weekend of 6th-8th December. 48 hours after their successful Atlantic Crossing, I’ve had time to reflect on what was a real high point and learning experience for our local kiteboarding community.

The idea was perfect, meet Enable Passion riders on the water and ride down wind with them to land at Blue Haven’s beach. Truth be told, the reality was always going to be tricky, fraught with potential hazards and disasters. However, its not everyday that kiteboarders cross an entire ocean. The last time such a famous feat ended in the Turks and Caicos was 521 years ago, under the guidance of Christopher Columbus.

The fact that these riders were coming to Leeward and Blue Haven made the invite to participate impossible to turn down. For those who don’t know Big Blue’s “Rebel Base” is on the water in Leeward. We have been diving, snorkeling, kayaking, paddleboarding and kiteboarding this area for over 15 years and some of us over 30 years. We had to at least try and guide Enable Passion through this stunning area of natural beauty.

Early emails were sent to the local kite community and only but a few responses came back. Bad news, I thought. No one’s interested. Early into their venture, Enable Passion’s Double A had lost not one but both propellers to the deep blue sea and were forced to head south of their proposed route to the Cape Verde Islands. A week or so later, with new propellers, they headed back to sea but their course stayed southerly. Here in the Turks and Caicos most, myself included, thought that they’d never regain their intended North westerly course in order to make landfall. No doubt this was to blame for the lack of initial interest. However, once those trusty trade winds kicked in, as they have for sailors across the centuries, Enable Passion’s dream started to look like a distinct reality.

This time last week we called a safety meeting at Blue Haven’s Salt Bar & Grill. The ultimatum was set. Don’t come and you don’t get to ride.

I had already briefed our Big Blue team about the increasing possibility of this event but had not wanted to get too detailed as their arrival dates kept changing. That evening at Salt, I had no idea if 5 riders would show up or 25. Much to Ingo’s and my surprise local riders kept on arriving. Minutes before seven that evening Ingo introduced the Enable Passion dream and updated the TCI riders on their position. They were less than 100o miles away. A recorded on board video of Filippo and Erik brought their arrival into sharp reality and with it a genuine level of excitement.

A detailed safety briefing highlighting the variables and pitfalls of open ocean riding had most of our local riders on edge.

As the weekend passed and Enable Passion drew closer, local riders checked their gear, honed their self rescue techniques and continuously monitored wind reports on windguru. Tuesday’s arrival date was looking grim. Light wind, got lighter. NE switched to E and was threatening ESE. We ran procedures over again and again. The what if’s, the worst case scenarios, the ideal scenario, a sleepless night. A dummy run on the Sunday by team rider, Hope and myself, proved it was doable and that it would be exciting. It was exhilarating in fact. Blue water sailing, windsurfing or kiteboarding is a rush. But it was no joke. We both knew it. Safety was all that mattered. No heroes, no special cases. All that mattered was to follow protocol.

Cometh the day, cometh the hour. Big Blue was a hive of anxious activity.

A buzzing excitement enveloped our office as waivers were signed, kit was passed out, uniform collected, media, cameras, interviews, timing, skippers checking and rechecking their boats, kiters discussing wind while Enable Passion sailed their way to our open water meeting point. Skippers and crew, Paul, Blue, Dave, Mark, Ben, Elvardo double checked their roles while Hope, Mark, Roberto, Jess, Julien, Tom and I conferred on any potential hazards.

A BIG BLUE Thank you to the TCI riders. You are top sports! Following all safety instructions to the letter. A special mention to guides, Mark K, Hope, Roberto, Jess, Julien, Craig and Tom and skippers Paul, Dave, Mark P, Ben and Blue. You lot ROCK and were and are awesome. Thank you. Philip x A big shout out to Ingo and the Blue Haven team for bringing Enable Passion to Leeward!

Images provided by Andy Mann, Tropical Imaging. Agile Levin, Captain Dave and Tanya…thank you all.


Filed under: kite boarding

The Family Reunion – Transatlantic Kite Boarding

10:21 am

The atmosphere was electric as the family members of the Enable Passion Atlantic Crossing kite boarding team climbed aboard our new vessel, ‘Luna Del Mar’, on Tuesday morning. They were chomping at the bit to get out there to the welcome the riders and see their loved ones again.

We drove up the coast to rendezvous with the kiteboarders and drop off a Big Blue pilot aboard their mother-ship, Double A, a Lagoon 500 sailing cat, in order to run communications and help guide them in to the Blue Haven Marina on Providenciales.

The celebrations began even before we manoeuvred alongside. Flags were waving, horns were blowing, and everyone was cheering madly. The riders themselves were clearly pumped to be nearing land for the first time in nearly a month and of course for seeing their families after their epic odyssey.

The rain came and went but as the wind picked up we peeled away and watched with admiration as the adventurers launched their kites for the last time from the stern of their boat. It is a skill that the team had clearly honed over 27-days of non-stop relay kiting across an entire ocean.

And they kept at until all 6 riders were in the air by which time the fleet of Turks and Caicos resident riders had sailed out into the deep blue to join the fun. At this point we were all about 2 miles outside the reef somewhere off North Caicos. fulmira.com It w

getting excited

as an impressive sight and heart felt welcome from fellow kite boarding enthusiasts although most had never ventured this far from land, let alone out into water this deep.
And then the wind disappeared and there was no choice but to help the other Big Blue rescue boats fish all the Enable Passion and TCI riders out of the water. This was a shame but the Enable Passion riders and their families couldn’t have been happier.

Sooner than expected they were able to consummate their euphoric reunion and girlfriends, brothers, and mothers leaped off the boat into the sea to a warm embrace. We eventually got everyone back aboard and the kiters, beaming from ear to ear, congratulated each other with high fives and hugs all around; they had done it!!

 

true patriots

They had completed their 3750 mile journey across the Atlantic Ocean, following the same route and passion of Christopher Columbus 500 years before them on a voyage of self-discovery and ultimate adventure. It was a privilege to witness these scenes and to be part of the Big Blue Unlimited and Blue Haven teams that welcomed them to the shores of the Turks and Caicos Islands.


Filed under: kite boarding

New Snorkel cave found on West Caicos!

10:10 am

There is nothing better than discovering new places in the Turks and Caicos and after 16 years of exploring these islands we thought we’d covered most of it. But on Christmas Eve, whilst on a full-day adventure to West Caicos onboard our new luxury vessel, Luna Del Mar, we anchored in a sheltered cove along the leeward coast of West Caicos and discovered something exciting.

Luna Del Mar at West Caicos

It was a beautiful location where the seafloor quickly dropped down to a coral shelf at about 25ft in depth and then continued onto the sandy plain that runs out to the deep wall.  The water was very clear and there was healthy amount of fish swimming along the edge of the shelf. I noticed an open slot in the limestone and swam down to investigate.

With my legs vertically above me I poked my head down through the hole and was very excited to see a largish cave or tunnel extending under the rock to a beautiful opening about 30ft away. The cave itself was clearly providing shelter to a number of fish including a family of surgeon fish. The roof and sides of the cave was a wealth of invertebrate life including sponges, feather-dusters and various miniature corals.

West Caicos cave

We spent a fun hour free-diving down again and again to see the cave and view its inhabitants.

One of our guests, a gutsy 10 year girl, was an excellent free-diver and managed to build up her courage to make it through the cave unassisted. Not a bad feat at 25ft of depth.

West Caicos cave


Summer Camp Ideas For Active Kids

20th March 2017 10:02 am

As the school year draws to a close and the long summer months loom large, parents want to ensure that their kids don’t spend the entire summer cooped up in a basement sitting only inches away from a TV screen.kalama kamp

The goal is to keep your child active, engaged, and mentally sharp so that summer can be as much about learning as the school year.

Luckily, every kid still dreams of going to summer camp. Whether it’s the traditional American Dream, cabin-in-the-woods camp, or something a little more international and adventurous, there are plenty of options out there for parents looking for summer camp ideas.

Traditional Sleepaway Summer Camps

Traditional summer camps give your kids the classic sleepaway camp experience. Spending the summer up in the woods, sleeping in a bunk bed in close quarters with other boys or girls, your child will learn about comradery, teamwork, and independence from their parents.

These camps typically fill the day with activities like swimming, team sports, arts and crafts, learning about nature, and other educational activities.

These camps can last as long as only one week, or for the entire summer. Keep in mind that these camps are best for truly independent, responsible kids who don’t mind being away from their parents for extended periods of time.

Faith-Based Camps

Faith-based summer camps are very similar to traditional summer camps, but with the added feature of incorporating the child’s faith into daily activities, and meeting kids with similar religious backgrounds. Traditionally in America, these camps tend to be Christian or Jewish.

At Jewish faith camps, you’ll see Shabbat seamlessly integrated into the camp life experience. Kids will learn all about what it means to practice the Jewish faith, along with all of its cultural implications.

At Christian faith camps, your kids will not only learn about what it means to have faith in God, but also being part of a Christian community. Of course, you’ll still do the usual summer camp sports and activities.

Summer Day Camps

If you’re someone who wants to keep summer camp closer to home, then day camps are likely the best option for you. Day camps are great because parents can still work their 9 to 5 jobs while their kids have a blast during the day. Most of these camps last five days a week for one or two weeks at a time, but there are camps that extend into the weekend.

Like traditional summer camps, most day camps consist of full days of action, including arts and crafts, team sports, hiking, rock climbing, and games. If you’re looking for a low-commitment, easy-going camp experience, this is the option for you.

Specialty Camps

Looking for something a little more adventurous? Do you want anything but the traditional childhood for your child? Try something above and beyond and send your kid to a specialty camp. Whether it’s a sports camp, dance camp, equestrian camp, circus camp, band camp, or even science camp, your child can learn skills that will stay with them for an entire lifetime.

Some of these camps are full sleepaway camps, whereas others are just day camps.

Kalama Kids Kamp

Want to try something truly outside the box? Want to take part in your child’s unique summer adventure? Why not combine a vacation with your child’s summer camp experience?

If you’re looking for a summer holiday camp that gets your child off the couch and out into the true wilderness, then you should check out Big Blue’s Kalama Kids Kamp in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Kalama Kids Kamps are full of excitement, adventure, and non-stop thrills.

This isn’t your parents’ traditional summer camp. Kalama Kids Kamp is all about getting to know the ocean: its creatures, its waves, its ecology, and its potential for adventure.

What’s Involved in Kalama Kids Kamp?

Big Blue’s Kalama Kids Kamps take place for two weeks every July in the Turks and Caicos Islands. These camps are five days long, and are jam-packed with unique experiences that kids will remember for the rest of their lives.

From Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Kids will hit the crystal clear waters of the Atlantic Ocean to take part in:

Better yet, we at Big Blue have different levels of adventure summer camps fine-tuned to different skill levels to meet the needs of each child. We break kids into three skill levels, split into groups of eight to ten:

  • 10-14 years old, non-diving ($400 per week): This is a great introduction to our Kalama Kids Kamps. Taking place in shallower seawaters, kids will learn to get comfortable kayaking, snorkeling, and SUPing.
  • 12-14 years old, junior open water diving ($485 per week): The true to step to becoming an ocean adventurer, in this level, kids will focus on becoming certified as junior open water divers.
  • 12-16 years old, junior advanced open water diving ($585 per week): This level is for kids who’ve already earned their junior diving licenses. We’ll put their diving skills to the test, and take part in more advanced dives.

Why Visit the Turks and Caicos Islands For Summer Camp?

While your kids are away at camp, you can explore the Turks and Caicos Islands on your own. What’s there to do on the Turks and Caicos Islands?

Why not follow in your kids’ footsteps and check out some of the Islands’ high-thrills activities. Get out on the water and try out a stand-up paddleboarding or kayaking tour, learn to kiteboard from some of the world’s top experts, or scuba dive in some of the Caribbean’s most impressive coral reefs.

Looking to stay dry? Take a private boat charter, take a biking tour around the islands, or simply hang out on the beach with a cold drink and delicious plate of freshly caught seafood.

To learn more about the adventures that await your child in the Turks and Caicos Islands, contact Big Blue Unlimited and book today. Our Kids Kamps will leave your child with a lifetime of memories.


Filed under: Activities

What to do on Turks and Caicos Islands

15th March 2017 1:50 pm

The Turks and Caicos Islands are quickly becoming one of the most popular vacations spots in the Caribbean. Sitting east of the Bahamas, this paddle boarding turks and caicospicture-perfect tropical destination is more than just a place to sit around lying on the beach.

While the population of Turks and Caicos is only 32,000, these islands see over 600,000 visitors each year thanks to stunning natural visuals, world-class upscale resorts, an exciting nightlife, and unbeatable recreation.

If you’re planning on visiting, here’s a list of things to do on the Turks and Caicos Islands.

Beaches and Oceans

The number one reason people come to the Turks and Caicos Islands is to enjoy some of the most beautiful waters in the world. Every corner of the islands features perfect white-sand beaches and bright, turquoise waters that will make you feel like you were dropped into the middle of a postcard.

While you may be satisfied with a simple stroll down these pristine beaches or a casual swim in the ocean, Turks and Caicos is much more than that. Here are some more high-thrills adventures to take advantage of the perfect blue waters.

Scuba Diving and Snorkeling

Turks and Caicos is one of the world’s prime scuba diving destinations. If you’re looking for things to do in Turks and Caicos, this is something that can’t be missed.

The islands of Grand Turk, Salt Cay, and Providenciales (known to locals as “Provo”), are each known for their spectacular wall diving. These islands sit atop two underwater limestone mountain plateaus that are divided by a 6,000-foot-deep chasm. As a result, the area is home to some of the best wall diving on the planet.

In addition to these stunning wall drops, you’ll find incredible barrier reefs complete with tube sponges, schools of fish, reef sharks, hawksbill turtles, and even humpback whales. The Turks and Caicos are home to the third-largest coral reef system in the world, so it’s worth a dip down below the surface to check it out.

If scuba diving is a little too extreme for your tastes, many boat tours offer snorkeling adventures that will help even the most beginner divers to experience the beauty of the coral reef.

Watersports and Eco Tours

It doesn’t end at scuba diving. When you come to the Turks and Caicos Islands, there’s a whole host of exciting watersports to keep the whole family entertained. And don’t worry about experience level—most excursions have options for beginners too.

Explore the area’s extensive mangrove channels by kayak. Take a paddleboarding tour through a beautiful national park and nature reserve. Take a ride on a gust of wind while kitesurfing. There’s no shortage of activities for thrill seekers.

If you prefer to take in adventure sitting down, take a boat tour or private charter around the islands. If you time your trip right, you may be lucky enough to witness the migration of humpback whales on a whale watching tour. There are also bike tours available to take in the sights on land.

For a complete guide of the adventures that await you in the Turks and Caicos Islands, check out our entire list of island eco adventures to keep your heart pounding the entire time.

Island Fish Fry

The Island Fish Fry is the perfect way to get a taste of the local Turks and Caicos cuisine. This free weekly event, which takes place in Provo every Thursday night from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., offers food from a wide variety of the most delicious local restaurants.

From island delicacies like perfectly cooked lobster, crab ‘n rice, freshly caught local fish, or hearty favorites like mac ‘n cheese, the Island Fish Fry will never have you leaving hungry.

The family-friendly event is also home to some of the islands’ best cultural acts. Every week, a host of local entertainers take the stage to impress the lively and diverse crowds of both locals and tourists. You’ll be on your feet all night dancing along with the local musicians—with different bands hitting the stage every week. Turks and Caicos is well known for ripsaw music, which prominently features the handsaw as the main instrument.

You’ll also find locally handcrafted goods like straw baskets and hats, fantastic storytellers, arts and crafts, and more activities to keep the whole family entertained for hours.

Golf

What’s a relaxing tropical vacation without a round of golf? With a reputation as one of the most skill-testing courses in the Caribbean, the Provo Golf Club features 18 stunning holes of world-class golf. The course blends in to the natural surroundings of the island, showcasing limestone outcroppings, local wildlife, and natural water features.

You don’t have to worry about lugging your clubs to the island with you, as the Provo Golf Club offers brand new Taylor Made Club rentals that’ll keep you on the top of your game—and you’ll need to be, as 11 of the course’s 18 holes have water features that you’ll have to avoid. Although, if you do end up in the water, you’ll have a nice view of the island’s water birds, that include pelicans, flamingos, and herons.

If you’d prefer to play a shorter 9-hole course, the Waterloo Golf Club, located close to the Cruise Ship Center in Grand Turk, offers a quicker option. But book your tee time early—they only hold spots open for 36 golfers per day.

Restaurants and Nightlife

Unsurprisingly, Turks and Caicos cuisine is largely centered around seafood. The most famous local ingredient is conch, which is a type of sea snail. You’ll find it centrally featured at top local restaurants like Coco Bistro and Le Bouchon du Village.

When the sun sets, the fun doesn’t stop. Every single night, no matter where you are, you’ll easily be able to find live Caribbean-style music, a karaoke bar, booze cruises, dance parties, and more. Whether it’s live Jazz, Rake ‘N Scrape, Ripsaw, or just a simple set of steel drums, you’ll never be far from live music.

To experience the best sights and sounds of Turks and Caicos, book a tour with Big Blue Unlimited now!

 


Filed under: Activities

When is the best time to travel to the Turks and Caicos Islands?

11th March 2017 1:46 pm

When planning any tropical vacation, or any vacation for that matter, it’s absolutely crucial that you research the best time of year to visit your ideal destination. While everyone wants to travel to Turks and Caicos during their native winVisit turks and caicoster, that won’t always be the best time to visit our islands.

So when is the best time to travel to Turks and Caicos? Truly, this place is great to visit year-round, but in our opinion, the best time to visit Turks and Caicos is during the months of April and May. Why? These months offer the ideal combination of avoiding huge crowd sizes, keeping travel costs down, enjoying a variety of water sports, and staying away from the rainy season.

High and Low Season in Turks and Caicos

As with any tropical destination, certain times of year are much busier than others in the Turks and Caicos Islands. Of course, every traveler is different, so you’ll have to decide how important crowd sizes are to you. The one major impact that crowd sizes will have is on your wallet—the busier the time of year, the more expensive your trip will be.

The busiest time of year for tourists in Turks and Caicos takes place between December and April. Traditionally, rates during these months can climb as high as 30% to 50% higher than you would find during low season. Not only are rates higher, you may have more trouble booking accommodations or booking activities.

The lowest season for travelers takes place between July and October. Not coincidentally, this time period is also hurricane season in the Turks and Caicos. As most people want to avoid the possibility of having their trip canceled by a hurricane, the end of summer and early fall tend to be far and away the cheapest time of year to plan a trip. If you’re willing to be flexible, you can save a lot of money by visiting between July and October.

Turks and Caicos Weather

As the Turks and Caicos are fairly close to the equator, the temperature doesn’t vary much from season to season.  The coldest month of the year is December, although cold is a relative term, as the average temperature in Turks and Caicos in December is a pleasant daily high of 80°F (27°C) and daily low of 73°F (23°C).

August and September are the warmest months of the year, typically experiencing daily highs of 88°F (31°C) and daily low of 80°F (27°C). Therefore, in terms of temperature, there’s never a bad time to visit.

Turks and Caicos Rainy Season

The Turks and Caicos rainy season typically takes place between the late-summer to early-winter months, from late August to early December. According to the National Climatic Data Center, November is the rainiest month, with an average precipitation of 3.7 inches, or 94 millimeters. Therefore, you may want to avoid travelling to the islands during this time.

That being said, on average, Turks and Caicos experiences some of the least amount of rainfall in the Caribbean, with an average of only one rainy day every 8.5 days in Providenciales. Even in the rainiest months, there’s only an average of 5-6 rainy days per month. With sunny skies almost every day of the week, it’s hard to go wrong here.

When Is Hurricane Season in Turks and Caicos?

Unsurprisingly, hurricane season coincides with the rainy season. The Atlantic hurricane season ranges from July to October, although hurricanes affecting the Turks and Caicos are actually quite rare.

What does this mean for your vacation? It’s actually still quite possible to plan a trip during these months, as long as you’re willing to be flexible. In terms of weather warnings, there’s normally at least a week’s notice when it comes to hurricanes. This means that you can open yourself to some of the lowest seasonal fares if you purchase weather insurance coverage on your airline ticket, or buy a flexible fare.

Most local accommodations are willing to offer refunds in the event of a hurricane or tropical storm, but if you’re booking during hurricane season, make sure to check your hotel’s weather policy before you book.

Best Time to Travel to Turks and Caicos By Month

December & January – December and January have some of the best weather of the year, with a near-perfect temperature and completely dry conditions. These months also have higher-than-average wind speeds and choppier water conditions, which make them perfect for kiteboarding, surfing, and windsurfing. The downside is that December and January are the busiest months of the year, and therefore, the most expensive.

February & March – The weather stays strong into February, with choppy ocean conditions and high wind speeds. February tends to be the best month of the year for whale watching in the Turks and Caicos, with spottings ending in March. Surprisingly spring break doesn’t hit the Turks and Caicos as hard as other Caribbean destinations, so prices start to drop in these months.

April – Above we picked April and May as the best times to visit the Turks and Caicos. The temperature is great, the ocean warms up, the winds are still strong enough for watersports, sportfishing is strong, the mosquitoes stay away, and crowds tend to die down.

May – The weather starts to warm up in the month of May, and the winds tend to die down. This makes May the ideal time to enjoy calmer water activities like stand up paddle boarding, kayaking, snorkeling, and diving. Prices also tend to get fairly low during May, making it a great time to visit.

June & July – June and July mark the start of hurricane season, although the average day is still calm and hot. As a result, these months tend to have some of the best conditions for enjoying the ocean.

August & September – These are the hottest months of the year. They can also be wet and full of mosquitoes. The ocean tends to be quite flat at these times of year, making them perfect for diving and snorkeling. These are some of the quietest times of the year, and therefore the least expensive.

October & November – At the heart of rainy season, these months can be heavy on mosquitoes. Every water sport is enjoyable at this time of year, assuming the skies are clear. The islands tend to get busier starting in November.

For more information about booking activities in the Turks and Caicos, or to learn more about local accommodations, contact Big Blue Unlimited today!


Filed under: Eco adventure